Ginger Nanoparticles Might Help Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

By jeremyc | August 20, 2016

Ginger nanoparticles might be effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study.

Inflammatory bowel disease or IBS is a term used for intestinal disorders that cause prolonged inflammation of all or part of the digestive tract. What causes IBS is not known. However, scientists suspect it to be an autoimmune disorder. In an autoimmune condition, the patient’s immune system attacks healthy cells.

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are two most common types of IBS. Both have similar symptoms, like pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, and loss of weight. Rectal bleeding is also common in IBS.

For some time now, scientists have been focusing on nanotechnology for delivering drugs in low dosages to specific target areas for treating IBS. The main advantage of using this technology is that it helps keep side effects to the minimum. The drug is administered to only a small targeted area, so the rest of the body doesn’t have to deal with it.

Ginger is famous for its therapeutic effects. In alternative medicine, it is frequently used for treating many health issues, including arthritis, colds, migraines, hypertension, and nausea. Ginger in a supplement form is also used for aiding digestion.

However, for IBS, scientists focused on nanoparticles of ginger, which were obtained through super high speed centrifuging.

In animal study, scientists noted that ginger nanoparticles were effective in reducing acute colitis. Ginger nanoparticles also showed promise in preventing chronic colitis.

Topics: General Health News | No Comments »

Anemia Might Increase Death Risk in Adult Stroke Patients

By jeremyc | August 19, 2016

Older adults who have experienced a stroke and also have anemia might have an increased risk of death, according to a new study.

Nearly 800,000 individuals suffer a stroke every year in the US. Stroke is ranked as fifth leading cause of death in America. It is also the number one cause of long-term disability.

More than 80 percent of all stroke cases are ischemic, which occurs when there’s a blockage in the artery that’s responsible for delivering oxygen-rich blood to the brain. The other common stroke is hemorrhagic stroke, which occurs when there’s a rupture in a blood vessel in the brain.

It has been noted that a good number of patients who suffer a stroke also has anemia, a health condition characterized by low hemoglobin levels. In anemia, the body’s tissues and organs do not receive as much oxygen as they should. Common symptoms of anemia are pale skin, headache, fatigue, dizziness, chest pain, and shortness of breath.

Anemia can affect anyone. However, it is more common among elderly and pregnant women.

In the current study, the researchers aimed to understand how having anemia increases the risk of death in older adults who have had a stroke. The team considered data of about 8,000 adults who had suffered a stroke. The average age of the studied group was 77 years.

The researchers found that the risk of death increased in adults who had suffered ischemic stroke and who also had anemia by two times in comparison to adults who had experienced ischemic stroke but didn’t have anemia. The risk of death in patients who had hemorrhagic stroke as well as anemia was 1.5 times more.

Topics: Stroke | No Comments »

Unhealthy Diet during Pregnancy Linked to ADHD in Child

By jeremyc | August 18, 2016

A healthy diet is mighty important for an expectant mother. A new study confirms this. According to it, children who exhibit conduct disorder in their early years are more likely to exhibit symptoms of ADHD if their mother had consumed a diet rich in fat and sugar during pregnancy.

Inability to follow rules, aggression toward others, disregarding feelings of others are telltale signs of conduct disorder. Children with conduct disorder might show a tendency of lying to avoid what they don’t want to do or win a favour, skipping school, damaging property and harming people and animals.

Evidence shows that conduct disorder and ADHD are interlinked. Over 40 percent of children with conduct disorder also have ADHD. Following an unhealthy diet in early years has been linked to both ADHD and conduct disorder. ADHD is believed to be triggered by DNA methylation of IGF2 gene.

As IGF2 gene plays a role in not only fetal development but also in development of those brain areas that are affected in ADHD, the researchers thought it might be possible that unhealthy diet followed during pregnancy might affect IGF2 in such a manner as to put the child at a risk to behavioral problems.

In the study, the researchers assessed data of over 150 children and their mothers. The researchers found that consumption of high-fat, high-sugar diet by mother during pregnancy was linked to higher IGF2 methylation in the child at birth.

A higher recording of IGF2 methylation at birth in children who exhibited conduct disorder, in turn, was linked to development of more ADHD symptoms between 7-13 years of age.

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Calcium Supplement Increases Risk of Dementia in Elderly Women with Cerebrovascular Disease

By jeremyc | August 17, 2016

According to a new study, the risk of dementia increases in senior women having cerebrovascular disease if they take calcium supplements.

Cerebrovascular disease is an umbrella term referring to diseases which affect the blood supply to the brain, leading to a limited or no supply of blood to certain parts of the brain. Some common types include stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vascular dementia, and transient ischemic attack.

Many elderly women take calcium supplements because of osteoporosis, a common health condition effecting older people. Osteoporosis worsens with calcium deficiency and therefore patients are recommended to take calcium supplements to meet the daily calcium requirement of 1,000-2,000 mg.

However, in last few years, more and more voices have questioned the safety of calcium supplementation.

For this study, the researchers investigated 98 elderly women, all of whom were using calcium supplement. Fifty four women have had experienced stroke before the start of the study and another 54 women suffered stroke during the follow-up. Researchers also noted that 52 women developed dementia during the follow-up period.

The researchers found that the risk of dementia was two times greater in women who were on calcium supplementation compared to women who weren’t. This increase in the risk, however, was only noted in those women who had cerebrovascular disease.

The researchers also noted that the risk of developing dementia was seven times more in women who have had a stroke and who also used calcium supplements in comparison to women who have had a stroke but weren’t on calcium supplementation.

Topics: Alzheimer's/Dementia | No Comments »

Healthy Diet, Regular Exercise Can Reduce Alzheimer-causing proteins

By jeremyc | August 16, 2016

Eating healthy and exercising regularly reduce the risk of obesity as well as of several other health conditions. Now a new study has revealed another benefit. The study suggests these two lifestyle factors can slow Alzheimer’s progression.

In the study, the researchers noted that the accumulation of two Alzheimer’s causing proteins, tau and beta-amyloid, was less in those people with mild memory problems who adhered to a Mediterranean diet and exercise regularly. Buildup of tau and beta-amyloid is a distinct characteristic of Alzheimer’s.

The results of this study came out a few days after another study had hailed Mediterranean diet to be beneficial against Alzheimer’s. However, this study differs from the previous study and others before it. This study shows for the first time how lifestyle factors like following a Mediterranean diet affects accumulation of Alzheimer’s-associated proteins in people who have mild memory problems.

The researchers enrolled 44 adults for their study. Twenty-four participants suffered from a condition known as subjective memory impairment. In this condition, the person thinks he or she has memory problems. The remaining 20 participants suffered from mild cognitive impairment, that is, in their case others observed that they had memory problems.

The participants were asked to report their BMI, activity levels, and the degree to which they adhered to a Mediterranean diet.

The researchers noted that participant whose BMI was healthy and who exercised regularly and adhered to a Mediterranean diet recorded lower buildup of Alzheimer’s-associated proteins in their brain than people who didn’t follow these healthy lifestyle factors.

Topics: Alzheimer's/Dementia | No Comments »

Fustobacteria Cause Colorectal Tumors to Worsen

By jeremyc | August 11, 2016

A latest study reveals that mouth microbes, which are known as fustobacteria, might accelerate colorectal tumors. This they are believed to do through a certain sugar binding protein, which allows fustobacteria to stick to colorectal tumors.

The death rate from colorectal cancer is very high, in both men and women. As a matter of fact, it appears in the list of first four leading causes of death related to cancer in men and women.

While thanks to better colorectal cancer screening tests available now, the death rate from it has reduced. However, experts believe the death rate from this cancer has not reduced as much as it could, chiefly because many people are not getting screened for it.

Earlier animal-based studies have demonstrated fustobacteria to worsen colorectal cancer. However, these studies did not reveal how fustobacteria played a role in aggravation of colorectal polyps and cancers. The latest study is the first one to study this.

The finding of this study appeared in Cell Host & Microbe. It stated that using a specific sugar binding protein, mouth bacteria attach themselves to colorectal tumors and thereby worsen the disease.

Topics: Cancer | No Comments »

New Drug Class Might Treat Multiple Myeloma More Effectively

By jeremyc | August 10, 2016

Researchers have found a new class of anticancer agents that might effectively treat multiple myeloma, a cancer caused by malignant plasma cells. The new research shows that a certain protein known as MCL-1 is needed by myelomas to stay alive. Therefore, drugs that target this protein might prove effective against multiple myeloma. At present, MCL-1 inhibiting drugs are in the pre-clinical development stage.

The treatments available at present for treating multiple myeloma do not cure the condition, but rather focus on halting disease progression and relieving symptoms.

In this research, the scientists examined those proteins that help myeloma cells stay alive. These proteins are termed as survival proteins. Earlier research had shown that BCL-2 family proteins are needed by many cancer types to stay alive. Because of this finding, there has been a lot of talk about the use of BH3-mimetics, a class of anti-cancer agents that inhibit BCL-2 protein, for many years now.

The focus of the latest research was to identify those BH3-mimetics which will treat multiple myeloma most effectively. The scientists found that most of myeloma samples couldn’t live when they inhibited MCL-1. This finding could pave the way for a new treatment that focuses on inhibiting MCL-1.

Topics: Cancer | No Comments »

Sleep Apnea Linked to Pediatric Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Progression

By jeremyc | August 9, 2016

In a new research, scientists have found that children with pediatric non-fatty liver disease who have obstructive sleep apnea are at an increased risk of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

When people who do not take alcohol or take it in a little amount have fat accumulation in their liver, they are said to be having non-alcohol fatty liver disease. It is a fairly common condition, and in many cases exhibits no symptoms and causes no complications.

However, in some cases the condition progresses to a more severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, in which there is scarring as well as inflammation in the liver.

Data shows that incidence rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in both adults and children are increasing worldwide, especially in developed countries. There is also strong evidence that shows that there is a link between progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and sleep apnea and low night-time oxygen.

The latest study shows that oxidative stress caused by sleep apnea due to obesity and low night-time oxygen contributes to progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Topics: General Health News | No Comments »

New Asthma Pill Significantly Reduces Asthma Symptoms

By jeremyc | August 8, 2016

Nearly 40 million people in the US suffer from Asthma, out of which almost 10 million are children. Asthma is a respiratory disease which causes chest tightness, breathlessness, wheezing, and coughing.

Through medication and avoidance of asthma triggers, patients can keep asthma under control. However, the condition affects many throughout their life.

Now, a new pill called Fevipiprant might change all this. This pill might significantly reduce asthma severity. Experts are calling it a game-changer, as the initial research has shown great promise.

The researchers enrolled 61 people for their research. One set of the participants were administered 225 mg of Fevipiprant two times daily for a period of 12 weeks, and the other group took placebo. Patients of both groups continued taking their other medications like before during the course of this 12-week study.

The severity of asthma is measured using sputum eosinophil count. The reading of the normal people is usually lower than 1 percent; whereas, patients having moderate to severe asthma usually show a reading of close to 5 percent.

The researchers found that sputum eosinophil count of patients with moderate to severe asthma taking Fevipiprant dropped from 5.4 percent to 1.1 percent during the course of the study, which was 12 weeks.

Topics: Asthma | No Comments »

Soy Linked with Better Cardiovascular Health & Lower Diabetes Risk in Women with PCOS

By jeremyc | August 6, 2016

A recent research suggests consumption of soy might be beneficial for women having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Eating soy might help improve cardiovascular as well as metabolic health in these women.

A hormonal disorder, polycystic ovary syndrome can affect fertility and pregnancy, besides causing problems with menstrual cycle and cardiac function. PCOS occur because of an imbalance in sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone. Women suffering from PCOS have unusually high level of progesterone or male hormone. PCOS causes growth of benign masses on the ovaries (known as ovarian cysts).

It is estimated that no fewer than 70 percent of infertility issues in women are caused primarily by PCOS. Women having PCOS have also been found to have a greater risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type II, and heart disease. This hormonal disorder is also linked to metabolic syndrome which is known to play a role in diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.

For this study, the researchers enrolled 70 women with PCOS. The participants were divided into two groups. One received 50 mg of soy isoflavones daily for a period of 12 weeks. The other group took placebo daily for the same period.

Through blood samples, the researchers noted the oxidative stress, inflammation, endocrine, and metabolic biomarkers of each patient twice, once at the start of this study and then after 12 weeks.

The researchers noted that women consuming soy isoflavones recorded noticeably lower levels of biomarkers linked to insulin resistance, a health condition which can develop into diabetes type II, compared to women who took placebo.

Intake of soy isoflavones was also found to be linked to noticeable reductions in LDL or bad cholesterol, triglycerides, and testosterone levels.

Topics: Women's Health | No Comments »

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