Azilect

and/or alternativesChemical Ingredient: Rasagiline Mesylate
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What is a generic medication?

Generic medications are significantly discounted copies of brand name medication that have the same active ingredients, intended use, dosage, side effects, effects, and route of administration as the original brand name medication. In other words, generic medications have the same pharmacological effects as their brand-name counterparts. Over half of all prescribed medications are for generic medications.

Azilect 0.5mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 0.5mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 0.5mg

Generic Alternative to Azilect 0.5mg

Azilect 0.5mg

Azilect 0.5mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 0.5mg

  • Manufactured by Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
  • Product of Canada • Shipped from Canada
  • Prescription Required
Rasagiline Mesylate 0.5mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 0.5mg

Generic Alternative to Azilect 0.5mg

  • Manufactured by Sun Pharma
  • Product of India • Shipped from India
  • Prescription Required

Azilect 1mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

Generic Alternative to Azilect 1mg

Azilect 1mg

Azilect 1mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

  • Manufactured by Lundbeck
  • Product of Turkey • Shipped from Turkey
  • Prescription Required
Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

Generic Alternative to Azilect 1mg

  • Manufactured by Sun Pharma
  • Product of India • Shipped from India
  • Prescription Required
Also available in United Kingdom More details

Azilect 1mg

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

  • Manufactured by Lundbeck Ltd
  • Product of United Kingdom • Shipped from United Kingdom
  • Prescription Required
Also available in United Kingdom More details

Rasagiline Mesylate 1mg

Generic Alternative to Azilect 1mg

  • Manufactured by An MHRA approved UK Generic Manufacturer
  • Product of United Kingdom • Shipped from United Kingdom
  • Prescription Required

Who Should Take Azilect

Azilect has been in use since 2006 and is often prescribed to patients with Parkinson’s disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system which involves the loss of brain cells that produce the neurotransmitter, dopamine.

Azilect helps to increase levels of dopamine and serotonin in the brain, which in turn alleviates symptoms associated with the disease. Azilect may be prescribed on its own, or in combination with other drugs, in order to help alleviate symptoms such as muscle stiffness, tremors, stooped posture, spasms, decreased mobility, and poor muscle control. Often, Azilect is prescribed in tandem with a drug called Levodopa.

Azilect is available in 0.5mg and 1mg tablets. It is usually taken once a day with or without food. As any prescription drug, Azilect is to be taken only after a consultation with a physician and administered as per the physician’s instructions. Once a patient may start to see improvement in symptoms within a week of starting medication. Azilect typically requires up to eight weeks to see the full effects.

Contraindications and Precautions

Azilect belongs to a class of drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) inhibitors and should not be taken or prescribed with drugs or substances with similar effects. This includes painkillers such as meperidine, tramadol, methadone and propoxyphene. Medications such as dextromethorphan and cyclobenzaprine are also MAO-B inhibitors, as well as herbs such as St. John’s wort.

Patients taking this drug may experience hypertension and are also at an elevated risk for developing melanoma, a type of skin cancer. Other unwanted side effects may include drowsiness and falling asleep during day-time activities, as well as psychotic-like or impulsive behavior and hallucinations.

When taken with antidepressants, Azilect may cause some patients to develop serotonin syndrome, a possibly fatal condition with varied symptoms (depending on the severity) including tremors, high blood pressure, restlessness and confusion.

The most common adverse reactions of taking Azilect include a flu-like syndrome, joint pain and depression.

The information above is a quick summary of Azilect facts provided by third parties. Patients should always refer to a physician for medical advice on how to administer this drug, and any other drug-specific questions they may have.

Generic Alternatives to Azilect

The active substance in Azilect is rasagiline mesylate which has been used to produce generic alternatives of the brand-name drug. Available through our online pharmacy, patients can buy drugs from a number of international manufacturers.

As with the brand-name drug, a number of issues must be considered when patients take a generic alternative. Any patient considering a switch from Azilect to a generic medicine should first discuss this with their physician. As with the brand-name drug, a number of adverse reactions may occur.

A potentially serious adverse reaction, which is avoidable, is the so-called “cheese reaction”, which can lead to high blood pressure and arrhythmia. This occurs when fermented substances in foods like aged cheese and drinks such as wine and beer react with medications. Also to be avoided are soy sauce, various types of pickles and smoked foods like dried meats. Some types of medications, for example decongestants, can also bring on a dangerous reaction.

Azilect in the News

Teva’s Pricey Parkinson’s Drug Unnerves Some Patients

The price of Azilect – one of the most commonly prescribed treatments for Parkinson’s Disease – has increased more than twice since 2006, making the drug unaffordable for many patients. The most recent price increase was in July 2016. Drug manufacturers often raise prices before generic versions of their brand-name medicines become available on the market.

Source:www.cbsnews.com/news/tevas-pricey-parkinsons-drug-azilect-unnerves-some-patients/

Mylan Launches Rasagiline Tablets

Pharmaceutical company, Mylan, has announced the launch of Rasagiline Tablets, a generic version of brand-name drug Azilect. The company will offer 0.5mg and 1mg tablets.

Source:http://newsroom.mylan.com/2017-06-02-Mylan-Launches-Generic-Azilect-R-Tablets

Azilect Drug Information

  • Azilect Overview

    Rasagiline is used alone or with other medications (such as levodopa/carbidopa) to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease. It can help improve symptoms such as shakiness, stiffness, and difficulty moving. It can also help reduce the amount of "off" time (periods of slow movement or stiffness). Rasagiline belongs to a class of drugs known as MAO inhibitors. It works by increasing the levels of certain natural substances in the brain (such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin). Parkinson's disease is thought to be caused by too little dopamine in the brain.

  • How to Use Azilect

    Take Azilect by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually once daily. The Dosage of Azilect is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase. Do not stop taking Azilect without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when Azilect is suddenly stopped. Your dose may need to be gradually decreased. A very serious high blood pressure reaction may rarely occur if you eat a large amount of tyramine while taking rasagiline and for 2 weeks after you stop it. Avoid foods that are high in tyramine, like aged cheeses (such as Stilton cheese). Consult your doctor or dietician about which foods you should avoid and if you do not feel well after eating or drinking certain foods while taking Azilect. See also Side Effects section. Tell your doctor if Azilect stops working well or if your condition gets worse.

  • Azilect Precautions

    Before taking rasagiline, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details. Before using Azilect, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history,heart disease (such as coronary artery disease, heart attack, chest pain, heart failure), stroke, high blood pressure, severe/frequent headaches, liver disease, mental/mood disorders (such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression), diabetes, overactive thyroid, a certain kind of adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma), sleep disorders. Azilect may make you dizzy or drowsy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Limit alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis). See also Side Effects section. Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). During pregnancy, Azilect should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. It is unknown if Azilect passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

  • Azilect Misdose

    If you miss a dose of Azilect, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Take your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.

  • Azilect Interactions

    See also How to Use section. Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.diet pills/appetite suppressants (such as diethylpropion), drugs for attention deficit disorder (such as atomoxetine, methylphenidate), apraclonidine, bupropion, buspirone, carbamazepine, cyclobenzaprine, deutetrabenazine, dextromethorphan, methyldopa, certain supplements (such as tryptophan, tyramine), tetrabenazine, certain "triptans" used to treat migraine headaches (such as rizatriptan, sumatriptan, zolmitriptan), valbenazine. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin. Examples include street drugs such as MDMA/"ecstasy," St. John's wort, tramadol, certain narcotic medications (such as fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, tapentadol), certain antidepressants (including maprotiline, mirtazapine, SSRIs such as fluoxetine/paroxetine, SNRIs such as duloxetine/venlafaxine, tricyclics such as amitriptyline/doxepin), among others. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of these drugs. Some products can interact with rasagiline if you take them together, or even if you take them weeks before or after taking rasagiline. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you take anything in the list of products that may interact with Azilect, or any of the products that increase serotonin, within 2 weeks before or after taking rasagiline. Also tell them if you have taken fluoxetine within 5 weeks before starting rasagiline. Ask your doctor how much time to wait between starting or stopping any of these drugs and starting rasagiline. Taking other MAO inhibitors with Azilect may cause a serious (possibly fatal) drug interaction. Do not take any other MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, safinamide, selegiline, tranylcypromine) during treatment with Azilect. Most MAO inhibitors should also not be taken for two weeks before and after treatment with Azilect. Ask your doctor when to start or stop taking Azilect. Before using rasagiline, report the use of drugs that may increase the risk of extremely high blood pressure (hypertensive crisis) when combined with rasagiline, including herbal products (such as ephedra/ma Huang), allergy and cough-and-cold products (including dextromethorphan, decongestants such as phenylephrine/pseudoephedrine), and stimulants (such as amphetamines, ephedrine, epinephrine, phenylalanine). Rasagiline should not be used with any of these medications. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist for more details. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness including alcohol, marijuana (cannabis), antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol), and narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone).

  • Azilect Side Effects

    Dizziness, drowsiness, joint pain, heartburn, nausea, dry mouth, weight loss, or stomach/abdominal pain may occur. If any of these effects last or get worse, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly. To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position, especially when you first start taking rasagiline. Remember that your doctor has prescribed Azilect because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using Azilect do not have serious side effects. Tell your doctor right away if you have any serious side effects,fainting, loss of balance, mental/mood changes (such as confusion, depression, hallucinations), worsening muscle stiffness/twitching/uncontrollable movements, swollen ankles/legs, easy bleeding/bruising, unusual strong urges (such as increased gambling, increased sexual urges). Some people taking rasagiline have fallen asleep suddenly during their usual daily activities (such as talking on the phone, driving). In some cases, sleep occurred without any feelings of drowsiness beforehand. This sleep effect may occur anytime during treatment with rasagiline even if you have used Azilect for a long time. If you experience increased sleepiness or fall asleep during the day, do not drive or take part in other possibly dangerous activities until you have discussed this effect with your doctor. Your risk of this sleep effect is increased by using alcohol or other medications that can make you drowsy. See also Precautions section. Azilect may increase serotonin and rarely cause a very serious condition called serotonin syndrome/toxicity. The risk increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin, so tell your doctor or pharmacist of all the drugs you take.fast heartbeat, hallucinations, loss of coordination, severe dizziness, severe nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, twitching muscles, unexplained fever, unusual agitation/restlessness. Azilect may rarely cause an attack of extremely high blood pressure (hypertensive crisis), which may be fatal. Many drug and food interactions can increase this risk (see How to Use and Drug Interactions sections).severe headache, fast/slow/irregular/pounding heartbeat, chest pain, neck stiffness/soreness, severe nausea/vomiting, sweating/clammy skin (sometimes with fever), widened pupils, vision changes (such as double/blurred vision), sudden sensitivity to light (photophobia). A very serious allergic reaction to Azilect is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction,rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing. This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

    List of Azilect side effects
  • Azilect Storage

    Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

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